July 17, 2014

Tech Compensation Trends

Tech SalariesTech Industry Average Annual Wages


While real wages may be down 8% in the US since 2006, the tech industry paid an annual average wage of $93,800 in 2012, which is 98% more than the average private sector wage of $47,400. And California tech workers earn the highest average annual wage of $123,900, according to the TechAmerica Foundation.


Software Services Leading


The Cyberstates 2013 Key Findings include that the software services sector grew by 63,900 jobs in 2012, a 3.5 percent increase. Leading the way in high-tech employment was California (968,800), Texas (485,600), New York (318,200), Virginia (285,400 – 9.8% of with private sector workforce), and Florida (270,900). (more…)


December 27, 2012

Exciting, Well-Paying Tech Jobs in 2013

Exciting, Well-Paying Tech Jobs in 2013

Tech Trends

2013 To Do List - Get Top Paying Tech JobThe recent study by 2013 Salary Guides from Robert Half Technology and The Creative Group shows exciting promise for salary gains in information technology (IT) and creative roles. There is a high demand for these professionals as companies focus on building and improving their digital communications and make investments in IT infrastructure.


“The pressure on salaries is being felt wherever there is competition for tech savvy talent,” stated Logan Knight, IT Recruiter at Redfish Technology. “We are seeing a trend of rising pay for top-notch IT talent extends across industries such as healthcare IT, social and mobile applications, and big data.” (more…)


September 22, 2011

The Rock Stars of Silicon Valley

The Rock Stars of Silicon Valley

By Dominique Soenens, Vacature Magazine

© Griet Dekoninck

© Griet Dekoninck

Is the talent war over? 

Not in Silicon Valley.  In the technological heart of the U.S., software engineers enjoy the status almost of a rock star: companies fight to land them, their wages rose last year and they are sometimes prone to the most amazing extras.

End of June.  It’s smothering hot in Palo Alto, the university town in the heart of Silicon Valley.  People are strolling lazily down University Avenue, the tree-lined street that cuts the center in half.  On the covered patio of Starbucks, a good stone’s throw from the prestigious Stanford University, almost everybody is busy strumming on his laptop. Whether it’s a work meeting, a video meeting or a young start-upper working on the next big thing, a terrace with free Wi-Fi is a suitable area for many who work in the technology valley.

“I have a meeting soon, I just stopped in here with a friend,” said the 26-year-old technology consultant Jordan Buller, a laptop and coffee within reach.  “I studied computer science at the University of Virginia and came here because of the nice job offers that I’ve received. That was three years ago when the economy is badly made. Now it is much better. A lot of people are being recruited, and the demand is high, not only for people that graduated at top universities like Berkeley and Stanford.”  Many people come here. Did I dream of a business? Of course, everyone in Silicon Valley dreams of a business. I just have no concrete plans.”

Whether dreaming of their own project or not, engineers live (again) in a golden era in Silicon Valley.  Figures published in the NY Times indicate that this year alone, nearly 150,000 new technology jobs will be created in the U.S.. Over the last year, wages of top engineers – especially software engineers – have gone up. While the salaries for IT engineers have barely increased since the outbreak of the recent economic crisis throughout the rest of the U.S., a Dice salary survey of American experts indicates that salaries in Silicon Valley grew in 2010 by an average of 3 percent.  And this year, that percentage is much higher, by a whole lot.

“We’ve really seen the war for talent erupt over the last eight months,” said Andy Nacsin of Redfish Technology, a recruitment agency specializing in the high technology and clean technology sectors in Silicon Valley.  “Wages have since gone up by about 10 percent.  Companies are offering bonuses and shares, many companies are seriously pushing these to attract the talent they want.”

Translated with Google Translator.

Read the original article “De rocksterren van Silicon Valleyby Dominique Soenens




July 8, 2011

Tech Trends: Tech Talent Wars

Tech Trends

Tech Talent Wars

Despite gloomy overall employment numbers, we continue to hear about the demand for technology talent. The talent war is in full force in places like Silicon Valley and New York City. Wired.com recently published an article showing the talent tug of war between top Silicon Valley tech companies like Google, LinkedIn and Facebook; there is a steady stream of migration between the big names. The article cites the competition for top sales people and engineers as “extraordinary”.

Silicon Valley has been experiencing strong tech sector job growth. The computer and electronic products manufacturing sector are approximately 70,000 jobs under the dot-com boom levels; but the smaller information sector (Internet service providers, web portals and data processors) exceeded the dot-com job level in May, with about 48,000 jobs. Tech hiring has extended beyond engineering to sales and marketing. (more…)


May 30, 2011

Crowd Fund Investing, Reversing the Decline in Capital Formation

Crowd Fund Investing,

Reversing the Decline in Capital Formation

Startups and Small Businesses are a critical part of our economy. They provide the majority of new jobs and salaries that are used to purchase goods (food, gas, rent), and stimulate the economy. However, Startups and Small Businesses need cash to fund their businesses and hire Americans. With the financial meltdown, the traditional means of business financing (bank loans, credit cards and venture capital) are no longer available to 98% of businesses because banks are holding on to their cash, credit card interest rates are exorbitant and private capital is only available to a select few. Without access to cash, thousands of businesses in 2011 will not start or grow and that means fewer jobs and a weaker US economy.

There is a solution. It is called crowd funding – regular Americans, choosing to invest small amounts of money in small businesses in their communities. However the SEC doesn’t allow the average American to invest at all because of regulations written almost 80 years ago. (more…)


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