Connecting in Your Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Employer, Interview

Connecting in Your Interview

Ideas for meeting people and relationship buildingConnect in the Interview

 

Business is made up of people working together on an activity for the benefit of all involved: boss, employee, customer, the society at large hopefully! And the interview is an interactive opportunity for both employer and prospective employee to evaluate fit and decide if they want to collaborate on the company’s goals.

 

While hard skills may need to be verified, such as a software developer being able to coder efficiently, and while references should always be checked, the interview has other objectives beyond these. Read more »

How to Build Rapport in Your Job Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Interview, Job Search

Establishing Fit and Getting the Job Offer

Shaking hands

Eye on the Prize

 

The best outcome of an interview is a job offer at a great company, with good colleagues, in a challenging role, with satisfying remuneration. How do you get there? If you’ve been invited to the interview, most likely you are qualified, or at least pre-qualified for the position.

 

But getting to the offer and getting the offer you’d like means you’ve got to demonstrate your value as well as your ability to fit in with the team and jump right into the work. This can only be achieved if you can build rapport with your interviewers.

 

Two-Way Communication

 

An interview is an interactive dialogue not just a Q&A session that rephrases and reiterates the contents of your resume. And the interviewing goes both ways: Does the hiring manager and team think you are a good fit? Do you think the company, team and opportunity fit your objectives?

 

Convey Your Passion

 

This time to meet is all about communicating your passion and potential for the opportunity at hand. Show your true enthusiasm and appreciation for the position for which you are interviewing, the company’s new technology or market strategy, the leadership’s past record, the latest news the company has publicized. Make it abundantly clear that you can’t wait to get started, share ideas that you have and goals that you’d like to meet.

 

Your Interviewer is a Person too

 

Be prepared for the personal side of things not just the sales numbers or the coding test. Ask your recruiter or others who have interviewed with the company or work there about the interviewer’s style, personality, objectives and anything else you can learn in advance.

 

Pay attention to conversational cues and follow the interviewer’s lead. Listen attentively so that you understand not only the literal information that you are being but also can pick up on the emotional cues and gain insights into the interviewer’s points of pride, or particular challenges, his greatest need in this hire.

 

Research the People

 

Research the people you will be meeting with so you know and understand their backgrounds, and any connections you may share. Ask questions about how their own path led to where they are, what they learned along the way, and what their goals are. Complement the interviewer on his or her accomplishments, and find a natural way to mention your own accomplishments and career goals.

 

Be Passionate and Informed

 

Research the company before the interview and note recent initiatives, products or campaigns the company has rolled out or its future objectives it has announced. Complement the interviewer on the company’s accomplishments and targets. Ask about what the interviewer would like you to accomplish in the first 3-6-12 months on the job, and about upcoming projects or challenges you’d get to be involved in.

 

Connecting

 

Throughout, find points of connection. This may be past or present colleagues, alumni from past schools or clubs, shared travel and hobbies, mutual places you’ve lived. Use humor to create a light and relaxed atmosphere. Show your genuine warmth and personality, be respectful and appreciative.

 

In short, if you can be likeable, communicate your skills and accomplishments, and show you really want this job, while making a personal connection, you will build the rapport with the interviewer that distinguishes you from other candidates. This rapport will give the interviewer confidence that you are an easy person to communicate with, who will fit in with the team, and who is passionate about the opportunity.

 

About the Author:

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, brings together in-the-trenches recruiting experience as well as years of marketing and sales success in a variety of industries from software to real estate development. She thrives on evangelizing the Redfish brand and communicating Redfish’s expert recruiting services, to drive bottom line results.

Redfish Technology

Building Growth-Mode Tech Companies with Hand-Picked Talent

Founded in Silicon Valley in 1996, Redfish Technology is a leading provider of high tech professional and executive talent. Partnering with growth mode companies, small and large, Redfish staffs executive functions and builds out the teams below. Redfish experts provide advice and perspective on hiring, career building, and job search – check us out on the web: www.redfishtech.com

Do I Have to Disclose My Salary?

Filed under: Interview, Redfish Speaks, Salary

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter, Sales & Marketing

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

 

Salary Disclosure Questions Pre-Interview Process

There are a lot of opinions on salary negotiations and salary disclosure: Should you tell your current salary or just your desired salary? Should you give this up front if asked, or save it until you are at an offer stage? In our experience, most all companies are going to want to know both your current salary and your desired before investing in the interview process, some will even want your full salary history.

 

Reasons for the Salary Question

From the point of view of a recruiter working with primarily growth-mode tech companies, there are compelling reasons for the salary question. Read more »

Soft Skills: Easy to Feel Out, Harder to Test

Filed under: Hiring Strategies, Interview, Recruiter / Recruiting, Redfish Speaks, Talent Acquisition, Training

While hard skills are fairly easy to evaluate, soft skills are harder.

Soft-Skills-Definition

The soft skills are rather intangible: communication, leadership, critical thinking, creativity, team collaboration, attitude, common sense, and relationships, amongst others.

Coding and problem-solving tests are fairly straightforward ways to gauge hard skill level, but how do you measure a candidate’s soft skills?

Evaluating Soft Skills

 

Social Media

Almost everyone in the United States has at least one social networking profile at this point, so researching a candidate’s online presence is fairly easy. Social media and websites provide an interesting window into a person’s soft skills. Of interest is everything from how thoroughly and professionally people present themselves, to the content and comments that they choose to post on online media.

Video Interviewing

Some companies solicit video responses as a filtering mechanism that quickly gives a sense of a person’s soft skills. A company may ask candidates to answer a few questions in a video format to be submitted along with a resume or as the next step in the pre-interview process. There are obviously a lot of efficiencies gained by getting a peek at talent, although some people are fairly shy of performing in front of a somewhat anonymous audience. Read more »

Do You Really Want to Work There? Get Your Questions Answered When Interviewing for a Job

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Job Search, Redfish Speaks

Do You Really Want to Work There?

Get Your Questions Answered When Interviewing for a Job

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager

By Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, Redfish Technology

The interview process is the usually final step in a company’s selection and vetting process, contingent upon reference and background checks of course.

For candidates this is also the last step typically in the application process. And certainly it is the best opportunity to learn as much as possible about the work environment and company culture, the personalities on the team and the management style, the less tangible aspects that aren’t written on the job description or the company website.

Recruiters often ask candidates along the application process to gauge their interest in a specific opportunity. This is something the candidate should be doing throughout the process. Read more »

Don’t Be Stymied In Your Job Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Job Search, Redfish Speaks

Don’t Be Stymied In Your Job Interview

Confused Adult Male Image courtesy of Imagerymajestic  FreeDigitalPhotos.net ID-10091477 Image courtesy of magerymajestic/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Imagerymajestic FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By Anna Mathieu, Redfish Technology
 

Unless you are a reporter, a recruiter, or other special personality, you probably don’t interview on a regular basis. An interview is a sales presentation, the company’s goal is to purchase (hire) a new employee and you want to be the choice. Honing any skill set requires practice and preparation.

You can practice with a friend or colleague by using a list of interview questions and asking your mock interviewer to change them up and throw some curve balls. You can practice aloud in the shower or in your car, answering classic questions that are likely to be asked, varying your vocabulary and presentation while hitting your main points. You can prepare by researching interview questions in your sector. Ask.com has a list of 20 common interview questions, and Forbes a list of 50 questions, or search for your niche, ex. Java developer interview questions. Read more »

Sure Fire Ways to Sabotage Your Job Interview, by Jon Piggins, IT Sales & Marketing Recruiter

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Redfish Speaks

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter, Sales & Marketing

Sure Fire Ways to Sabotage Your Job Interview

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

 

You Only Get One Opportunity to Make a First Impression

 

Flames  (Don't)When the interviewer greets you, don’t wait awkwardly and immobile in your seat.

 

Bull's eye (Do)Instead:

Make a great first impression, you only get one shot at this. When you meet the interviewers or any of the staff, look the person in the eye and say hello, offer your hand and shake hands confidently. Read more »

Become the Solution To The Job Interviewer’s Problem

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Job Search

Become the Solution To The Job Interviewer’s Problem

by Carole Martin, The Interview CoachCarole-Martin-the-Interview-coach

The absolute worst way to go to an interview is with the attitude of: “Please, please – hire me.”

When you go to an interview with that attitude you appear desperate. And even though you actually may be desperate in a difficult job market, you don’t want to appear that way.

The demeanor and attitude that you bring to the interview will set the tone for the entire interview.

Let’s look at it from the employer’s/interviewer’s point of view. Read more »

Giving Good Phone: How to Perform Well on a Telephone Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Redfish Speaks

Anna Mathieu

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications

Giving Good Phone

How to Perform Well on a Telephone Interview

By Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager

 

Almost every tech company these days will hold phone interviews before any onsite is scheduled. While this means you can keep you comfy slippers on, it doesn’t mean you should get too cozy. To perform well on a telephone interview, first you must prepare in much the same way as for an in-person interview (slippers aside). Next, you must put on your phone etiquette and your listening ears. Read more »

Ranking Yourself: Be Confident yet Self-Aware

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Interview

Nathan Stuller

Nathan Stuller

Ranking Yourself: Be Confident yet Self-Aware

By Nathan Stuller

 

A common interview tactic is to ask you, the candidate, to rank yourself on acquired technical skills, attributes, and aptitude. The interviewer may run through a list of them, asking you to simply “rank yourself from 1 to 10 on:”
• Leadership ability
• Getting along with coworkers
• How hard-working you are Read more »