What a Recruiter Looks For When Reading Your Resume

Filed under: Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Resume

 

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter, Sales & Marketing

What a Recruiter Looks For When Reading Your Resume

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

 

While I do not look through all of the 3M resumes that Google receives every year, my day often starts with resume review. I search our company database, various job boards, LinkedIn, etc; and just one search may bring back hundreds of resumes. For example, this morning 293 new or updated resumes came up, and out of those I only downloaded three.

 

Pundits say that your resume gets between 6 and 15 seconds of attention. So what I am and other recruiters looking for in those precious seconds? Read more »

Use Social Media to Make Yourself More Attractive in the Job Market. Part 2

Filed under: Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

Use Social Media to Make Yourself More Attractive in the Job Market

Part 2

Leah O'Flynn, Tech Recruiter

Leah O’Flynn, Tech Recruiter

By Leah O’Flynn Executive Recruiter & Team Manager, Tech Talent Division

 

Part one of this article focused on where you should spend your time making an online presence. Now that you know where to be, how do you make the most of your online presence?

 

Make the most of your social media in the job market –

 

As a recruiter, I look at social media pages to connect with people with the experience and skills I seek. Also, I use it to get an idea of who you are, what your personality is and if you will fit into a particular corporate culture. Employers and recruiters will find your profile more attractive if you follow some of this advice: Read more »

The Top 5 Secrets to Landing your Dream Job – By Tory Thomas

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Redfish Speaks

The Top 5 Secrets to Landing your Dream Job

By Tory Thomas, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

Tory Thomas, Executive Recruiter, Tech Sales & Marketing Division

I work with job seekers on a daily basis as a recruiter in the tech industry. Often times, candidates are unaware of a few tactics that can give them competitive edge in this market.

 

This difference between an active job seeker versus and passive job seeker is their work status. An active job seeker is unemployed, unsatisfied in their current role or a reduction in force is imminent whereas a passive job seeker isn’t necessarily looking for a new job. Read more »

How to Build Rapport in Your Job Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Interview, Job Search

Establishing Fit and Getting the Job Offer

Shaking hands

Eye on the Prize

 

The best outcome of an interview is a job offer at a great company, with good colleagues, in a challenging role, with satisfying remuneration. How do you get there? If you’ve been invited to the interview, most likely you are qualified, or at least pre-qualified for the position.

 

But getting to the offer and getting the offer you’d like means you’ve got to demonstrate your value as well as your ability to fit in with the team and jump right into the work. This can only be achieved if you can build rapport with your interviewers.

 

Two-Way Communication

 

An interview is an interactive dialogue not just a Q&A session that rephrases and reiterates the contents of your resume. And the interviewing goes both ways: Does the hiring manager and team think you are a good fit? Do you think the company, team and opportunity fit your objectives?

 

Convey Your Passion

 

This time to meet is all about communicating your passion and potential for the opportunity at hand. Show your true enthusiasm and appreciation for the position for which you are interviewing, the company’s new technology or market strategy, the leadership’s past record, the latest news the company has publicized. Make it abundantly clear that you can’t wait to get started, share ideas that you have and goals that you’d like to meet.

 

Your Interviewer is a Person too

 

Be prepared for the personal side of things not just the sales numbers or the coding test. Ask your recruiter or others who have interviewed with the company or work there about the interviewer’s style, personality, objectives and anything else you can learn in advance.

 

Pay attention to conversational cues and follow the interviewer’s lead. Listen attentively so that you understand not only the literal information that you are being but also can pick up on the emotional cues and gain insights into the interviewer’s points of pride, or particular challenges, his greatest need in this hire.

 

Research the People

 

Research the people you will be meeting with so you know and understand their backgrounds, and any connections you may share. Ask questions about how their own path led to where they are, what they learned along the way, and what their goals are. Complement the interviewer on his or her accomplishments, and find a natural way to mention your own accomplishments and career goals.

 

Be Passionate and Informed

 

Research the company before the interview and note recent initiatives, products or campaigns the company has rolled out or its future objectives it has announced. Complement the interviewer on the company’s accomplishments and targets. Ask about what the interviewer would like you to accomplish in the first 3-6-12 months on the job, and about upcoming projects or challenges you’d get to be involved in.

 

Connecting

 

Throughout, find points of connection. This may be past or present colleagues, alumni from past schools or clubs, shared travel and hobbies, mutual places you’ve lived. Use humor to create a light and relaxed atmosphere. Show your genuine warmth and personality, be respectful and appreciative.

 

In short, if you can be likeable, communicate your skills and accomplishments, and show you really want this job, while making a personal connection, you will build the rapport with the interviewer that distinguishes you from other candidates. This rapport will give the interviewer confidence that you are an easy person to communicate with, who will fit in with the team, and who is passionate about the opportunity.

 

About the Author:

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, brings together in-the-trenches recruiting experience as well as years of marketing and sales success in a variety of industries from software to real estate development. She thrives on evangelizing the Redfish brand and communicating Redfish’s expert recruiting services, to drive bottom line results.

Redfish Technology

Building Growth-Mode Tech Companies with Hand-Picked Talent

Founded in Silicon Valley in 1996, Redfish Technology is a leading provider of high tech professional and executive talent. Partnering with growth mode companies, small and large, Redfish staffs executive functions and builds out the teams below. Redfish experts provide advice and perspective on hiring, career building, and job search – check us out on the web: www.redfishtech.com

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Resume, Social Media

Recruiting Trends

Career Text On A Gold Key With Black Background As Symbol Of New Job

The Top 10 Best Recruitment Practices coming out of one the ERE Conference Think Tank Sessions include recommendations to hiring managers and recruiters on finding and engaging candidates. Carl Kutsmode’s article is a good read, especially for those recruiting talent.

 

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

What about advice for passive and active job seekers? How can job seekers understand these recruiting trends and leverage them in their own career management?

 

The Top “Get Recruited” Practices for Job Seekers (in no particular order)

 

Be findable online

As a job seeker, passive or active, you should be managing your LinkedIn profile, GitHub account, and other relevant specialized professional (social) media sites to provide an up-to-date professional portrait of yourself. Use keywords and active descriptions of your accomplishments so that searches are accurately identifying you.

 

Be attractive

I don’t mean you should go get a make-over, but ditch the selfie you took with your smartphone in a cubicle with those fluorescent lights that shows both chins. Make your online profiles attractive by keeping active on these sites, posting new projects, articles, updates, you increase the chances of being seen and promote a picture of yourself as a dynamic professional in your field.

 

Reach out

Search out the companies you like the most and connect with them via LinkedIn, and other media. Don’t just hit ‘connect’: Make a comment on their latest PR or post. Tell them you want to connect because you are passionate about their sector. Name the other professionals you have a relationship with at the company to strengthen the connection. Try to reach out in a meaningful way, it will give more momentum to further discussion and make you stand out. Connect with various players at the company from managers to HR.

 

Return calls/emails

When recruiting is done seriously, it is a sales function – the point is to get results. If you are contacted by an external recruiter or an internal HR person, respond even if you aren’t looking for a change now. A few minutes of prompt courtesy now will earn you respect and preference in the future; a lack of response or rudeness could get you blacklisted. No one wants to waste your time, and they certainly don’t want to waste their own time and effort.

 

Hackathon/Hangout

For those companies that really thrill you, try participating in a company event such as a hackathon or hangout. Participate actively so that you can show your stuff and facilitate making meaningful connections with the people working there. It may or may not get you a job offer today, but it will multiply your connections and differentiate you.

 

Post your resume

LinkedIn is definitely the best place to be for professionals, but there are many places to be online. Your own website is a great way to present what you want how you want. GitHub is a great place for developers to strut their stuff. Job boards are a great way to be found. Posting your resume is a good indication you are interested in dialogue and opportunities and not just counting down the days to retire or cash in your equity and move to the tropics!

 

Network!

Ok, all the above qualifies as networking. But there’s also meetup.com, industry associations, trade shows, alumni groups, special interest associations, and many, many opportunities. It may take a little time trying out various opportunities to find the right feel and return on your time, so take a look and start trying out those you haven’t yet.

The Getting Hired Elevator Speech

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

When is the last time you took an elevator?

optimistic young businesspeople on a white background

Some of you are rocking the views from your elevator ride! Some folks are taking the stairs wearing their activity tracker. Some folks have made successful careers in places where elevators are hard to find (yippee!), or where they stay in their fuzzy bunny slippers all day (ahhh). Whatever your case, do you have an elevator speech? Read more »

10 Things You Need to Do In Your Job Search

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

Ten Things You Need to Do In Your Job Search

Ten Things You Need to Do In Your Job SearchDo you find yourself looking for a new career opportunity? Has it been a while? Here are ten things you should do in your job search.

1. Set aside time every day to perform your job searching activities.

An active job search requires dedication. How much time will it take? That depends on your situation and your motivation. If you are working, it may be only 30-60 minutes per day; if you are out of work and are motivated to find a job soon, then you should consider your job search a full-time activity.

2. Do Some Self-Assessment.

Take a good hard look at yourself. What are your best attributes? What are your least developed ones? Where do you excel? What do you bring to the table? What are you accomplishments?  Quantify these. This exercise is imperative for re-vamping your resume and preparing for interviews, but more importantly this type of self-assessment should allow you to take a fresh look at the kind of work and industries that you want to pursue. Read more »

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Resume

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

LinkedIn, and Facebook, and Dice, oh my!

By Anna Mathieu
The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Professional networking site LinkedIn is the leading social media venue for career networking and recruiting alike. The concise display of Experience, Education, Skills, and Projects, peppered with Endorsements and Recommendations, ensures easy accessibility and searchability in a well-packaged graphic format.

 

Monster, Dice, CareerBuilder, The Ladders, Glassdoor, Execunet, etc. all offer a digital compendium of candidate’s qualifications. Not only can you search for jobs, but recruiters and hiring managers can use keyword search to land on your profile. One click applications make it easy peasy lemon squeezy to apply for a job. Read more »

50 Ways to Quit Your Employer – A Sing-A-Long

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search

50 Ways to Quit Your Employer

50 Ways to Leave Your Employer

Click here to listen to 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover on YouTube
or, …
if you aren’t into the tongue in cheek version,
see some straight up tips on resigning from your job

(Sing to Paul Simon’s 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover)

 

“The job offer has arrived”, my recruiter said to me
“The next steps then follow logically
I’d like to help you on some scenarios to foresee
There must be fifty ways to leave your employer”

She said, “It’s my role to make this smooth
Furthermore, you should call me if there are any issues
But I’ll repeat myself, to prepare for the interlude
You must give a letter of resignation to your employer
Two weeks’ notice to your employer”

Just stay on track, Jack
Advise on your new plan, Stan
You don’t need to contain your joy, Roy
Just get yourself free
Talk to your boss, Gus
You don’t need to discuss much
Your decision is final, Lee
And get yourself free Read more »

Should You Work for a Startup? – Redfish Tech Recruiters Share Their Perspectives

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Redfish Speaks

Should You Work for a Startup?Should-You-Work-For-A-Startup

Redfish Tech Recruiters Share Their Perspectives

 

Recruiting talent for big companies and startups in various stages of development usually means searching for talent with different profiles. The technical skills needed may be the same for both types of companies, but beyond skill sets, personality makes a crucial difference in terms of the talent sought.

 

Startups are not for everyone.

 

Every startup is different but regardless of the stage of the company, by nature these budding companies are typically not going to offer the same employment opportunities as large, established corporations.

 

Startups tend to be in unique niches in often untested waters, they are creating disruptive exciting technologies and new business models. They attract creative, confident risk-takers and strive to attract agile innovators who thrive on finding new solutions and making things happen. Read more »