What a Recruiter Looks For When Reading Your Resume

Filed under: Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Resume

 

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter, Sales & Marketing

What a Recruiter Looks For When Reading Your Resume

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

 

While I do not look through all of the 3M resumes that Google receives every year, my day often starts with resume review. I search our company database, various job boards, LinkedIn, etc; and just one search may bring back hundreds of resumes. For example, this morning 293 new or updated resumes came up, and out of those I only downloaded three.

 

Pundits say that your resume gets between 6 and 15 seconds of attention. So what I am and other recruiters looking for in those precious seconds? Read more »

Six Recent Resume Mistakes

Filed under: Redfish Speaks, Resume

Stumble, Bobble, Snafu, Fumble, Clanger, Howler

By Rob Reeves, Executive Tech Recruiter

Rob Reeves, CEO, Tech Recruiter

Rob Reeves, CEO, Tech Recruiter

On an average day, I read about 100-200 resumes. Some are amazing, most are adequate, and some go down in flames. When you make mistakes on your resume, you are seriously inhibiting your career options. Here are some resume boo-boos I’ve seen recently – don’t make these!

 

  1. Stumble – Infographic resume!

 

If you are such a rock star designer that you figure your gorgeous infographic resume is all you need and you would never stoop to creating a rote, insipid text resume, well oops. Many companies use an ATS or CRM of some sort, and even if they don’t, their recruiter likely does. Infographic or other non-standard formats can’t be read by most ATS/CRMs and so your resume could get missed entirely in many searches. While the infographic may seal the deal, there’s no deal to speak of if you aren’t identified from the start. So have the mundane word document ready along with the extraordinary visual resume.

 

  1. Bobble – View my resume online

Read more »

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Resume, Social Media

Recruiting Trends

Career Text On A Gold Key With Black Background As Symbol Of New Job

The Top 10 Best Recruitment Practices coming out of one the ERE Conference Think Tank Sessions include recommendations to hiring managers and recruiters on finding and engaging candidates. Carl Kutsmode’s article is a good read, especially for those recruiting talent.

 

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

What about advice for passive and active job seekers? How can job seekers understand these recruiting trends and leverage them in their own career management?

 

The Top “Get Recruited” Practices for Job Seekers (in no particular order)

 

Be findable online

As a job seeker, passive or active, you should be managing your LinkedIn profile, GitHub account, and other relevant specialized professional (social) media sites to provide an up-to-date professional portrait of yourself. Use keywords and active descriptions of your accomplishments so that searches are accurately identifying you.

 

Be attractive

I don’t mean you should go get a make-over, but ditch the selfie you took with your smartphone in a cubicle with those fluorescent lights that shows both chins. Make your online profiles attractive by keeping active on these sites, posting new projects, articles, updates, you increase the chances of being seen and promote a picture of yourself as a dynamic professional in your field.

 

Reach out

Search out the companies you like the most and connect with them via LinkedIn, and other media. Don’t just hit ‘connect’: Make a comment on their latest PR or post. Tell them you want to connect because you are passionate about their sector. Name the other professionals you have a relationship with at the company to strengthen the connection. Try to reach out in a meaningful way, it will give more momentum to further discussion and make you stand out. Connect with various players at the company from managers to HR.

 

Return calls/emails

When recruiting is done seriously, it is a sales function – the point is to get results. If you are contacted by an external recruiter or an internal HR person, respond even if you aren’t looking for a change now. A few minutes of prompt courtesy now will earn you respect and preference in the future; a lack of response or rudeness could get you blacklisted. No one wants to waste your time, and they certainly don’t want to waste their own time and effort.

 

Hackathon/Hangout

For those companies that really thrill you, try participating in a company event such as a hackathon or hangout. Participate actively so that you can show your stuff and facilitate making meaningful connections with the people working there. It may or may not get you a job offer today, but it will multiply your connections and differentiate you.

 

Post your resume

LinkedIn is definitely the best place to be for professionals, but there are many places to be online. Your own website is a great way to present what you want how you want. GitHub is a great place for developers to strut their stuff. Job boards are a great way to be found. Posting your resume is a good indication you are interested in dialogue and opportunities and not just counting down the days to retire or cash in your equity and move to the tropics!

 

Network!

Ok, all the above qualifies as networking. But there’s also meetup.com, industry associations, trade shows, alumni groups, special interest associations, and many, many opportunities. It may take a little time trying out various opportunities to find the right feel and return on your time, so take a look and start trying out those you haven’t yet.

Resumes – Lipstick on a Pig

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Redfish Speaks, Resume

Resumes – Lipstick on a PigDon't put lipstick on me!

If you Embellish, it will be a Blemish – or Much Worse

 

The results of a recent Career Builder survey have been splattered all over the internet in the last several days. The responses reveal that 58% of employers have caught a lie on a resume; and 33 % said they have seen an increase in resume embellishments post-recession.

 

The poll found that this transgressions include embellished skill set (57%), embellished responsibilities (55%), dates of employment (42%), job title (34%), academic degree (33%), companies worked (26%), and accolades/awards (18%). It is very interestingly the industry that finds the most fibbing is financial services (eh-hem) at 73%! But Information Technology came in a 63%, and Health Care at 63%.

 

HireRight.com, a provider of on-demand employment background screening, found that 34% of job applicants lie on resumes. Read more »

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Resume

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

LinkedIn, and Facebook, and Dice, oh my!

By Anna Mathieu
The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Professional networking site LinkedIn is the leading social media venue for career networking and recruiting alike. The concise display of Experience, Education, Skills, and Projects, peppered with Endorsements and Recommendations, ensures easy accessibility and searchability in a well-packaged graphic format.

 

Monster, Dice, CareerBuilder, The Ladders, Glassdoor, Execunet, etc. all offer a digital compendium of candidate’s qualifications. Not only can you search for jobs, but recruiters and hiring managers can use keyword search to land on your profile. One click applications make it easy peasy lemon squeezy to apply for a job. Read more »

Road Map Your Resume – By Leah O’Flynn, Sales & Marketing Recruiter High Tech

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Recruiter / Recruiting, Redfish Speaks, Resume

Road Map Your Resume

By Leah O’Flynn, Sales & Marketing Recruiter High Tech

Leah O'Flynn, Tech Recruiter

Leah O’Flynn, Tech Recruiter

 

Strategic thinking is key in plotting the course for a great career. In order to build a fantastic resume, thought needs to be put into creating the experience and accomplishments that great companies want. Here are some things to think about:

 

Diversification

 

Play the field but do so with some strategy when you are young and starting out.  Avoid more than three jobs within your first five years out of college. By year five, you should have a much clearer expectation of what you want from your job, what you have to offer, and what sectors are a good fit. Read more »

Resume Dos and Don’ts

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Resume

Resume Check ListResume Dos and Don’ts

There are a number of things you want to consider when it comes to resumes.

Make sure your resume is up to date.  Craft it to respond directly to the position or company you are trying to engage. Quantify your results. Brand yourself with the take-away you want your reader to retain.

Don’t forget your relevant contact information and make sure that your resume is easy to read. Don’t go off point, in most case people do not want to hear about your political leanings, religious beliefs, or personal campaigns. Don’t fudge dates or lie on your resume.

Your resume is your key to getting in the door, make sure you do and don’t include certain things. To read the top seven dos and don’ts and other articles on resumes, check out the Job Seeker Resource section of the Redfish website.

 

Tell us what you think the top resumes dos and don’ts are in your experience!

4 Ways to Customize Your Resume Based on the Job Posting

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Resume

4 Ways to Customize Your Resume Based on the Job Posting

By Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

I’m sure you’ve heard me say before that it’s critically important to customize your resume when applying for positions—especially to online job postings. Hundreds of candidates apply to positions posted on job boards, and employers have become very savvy at weeding out those candidates who are not qualified. Or who at least do not appear to be qualified because of what is or is not (in most cases) on their resume. So I’m going to share some tips for making key adjustments to your resume to target it exactly for the position based on the job advertisement.

Search for keywords

Look for keywords throughout the job posting related to the position and then include those keywords on your resume. For example, customer service resume keywords might include: account relationship management, customer retention, customer management, order processing, process simplification, relationship management, or service benchmarks.

Incorporate Required Skills

Most position descriptions include required skills or qualifications. Ensure that you address within your resume your ability to meet and exceed these required skills. For example, if one of the position requirements is service delivery, don’t just say “responsible for service delivery”. Show the employer how you successfully delivered this by saying something similar to this: Restructured service delivery procedures, improving staff field time by 35% and increasing customer satisfaction ratings by 92%.

Include Education & Credentials

Is a degree required for the position? Then make sure that you put this information front and center on the resume. Especially if you recently obtained the degree or credential required. If you possess an M.B.A.—and it’s required for the position—a great way to showcase that is to put the degree next to your name at the top of your resume.

Always Address Requested Information

If the job ad requests that you provide salary requirements, be sure to include these on your cover letter. Additionally, if the posting asks for any other additional information such as hours of availability, samples of your work, etc., make sure you always provide what they are requesting so as not to exclude yourself from consideration.

Additional job search and resume-related advice is available on our blog or by following us on Twitter or Facebook.

 

About the Author:

A nationally recognized resume expert, Jessica Holbrook Hernandez is President/CEO of Great Resumes Fast and a former human resources manager and recruiter. Author Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

 

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.

Jumping Back Into the Employment Marketplace. By Greg Schreiner, Technology Recruitment Manager

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Resume

Jumping Back Into the Employment Marketplace

Greg Schreiner, Recruiter Redfish Technology

Greg Schreiner, Technology Recruitment Manager, Redfish Technology

By Greg Schreiner, Technology Recruitment Manager

 

 If you’ve been unemployed, is this the right time to jump back in? The short answer is yes. In our view, it is always the right time to be employed! If you are a manager or executive, unless you are pursuing an advanced degree, nursing a loved one, climbing Everest, or making a lifetime trip across the globe, what would you rather be doing than keeping your skills sharp and making an impact in your favorite industry?

Read more »

5 Reasons Why You Need More Than a Good Resume to Stand Out from the Crowd

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Job Search, Resume

5 Reasons Why You Need More Than a Good Resume to Stand Out from the Crowd

Source: CareerAlley
http://CareerAlley.com

It is better to be prepared for an opportunity and not have one than to have an opportunity and not be prepared.” – Whitney M. Young

 

You’ve probably heard hundreds of times that your resume is the most important document in your job search, and, that is so. But if you want to stand out from the competition, I say you need more than a great resume. In the end, only technically qualified candidates will get to interview for any open job. And, while your resume may (or may not) help you get in the door, you will need more than your resume to get the job. So, you may ask, what else do you need? Lots of research, interview preparation and (unfortunately), additional “documentation”. Read more »