June 20, 2011

How To Evaluate a Job Offer

How To Evaluate a Job Offer

Congratulations! You’ve received a job offer. Now what?

 

First of all, ask yourself if you want this job. Hopefully you spent the time up front to evaluate the company and the position prior to pursuing it.  Sometimes things happen faster than you expect and you haven’t fully explored the opportunity. There are a lot of important aspects to research and consider when you are evaluating an employment opportunity. The more you know before the offer, the better position you’ll be in.

A company’s values, vision and corporate culture are going to fundamentally affect you on a daily basis. Does the company you are evaluating motivate and speak to you? Do you feel like it will be a fit with your personality and work style? Just as dating someone with a fundamentally different belief system would be a great challenge, so will working for a company where you do not buy into the mission and vision. (more…)

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June 15, 2011

Employers Beware: When Social Media Says Too Much…

Shannon Tinker

Shannon Tinker

Employers Beware:
When Social Media Says Too Much…

By Shannon Tinker

This month, Redfish explores the importance of background checks and references before extending a candidate a job offer. Responsible hiring decisions usually include basic steps to double-check that a candidate’s credentials are legit.  With an applicant’s consent, employers can quickly get reports about a candidate’s credit and criminal record, and this is perfectly legal.

In addition to old school, traditional background and reference checks, employers now have access to data that would make even the most seasoned Private Investigator blush.  Social media has opened the playing field making it fairly easy to gather personal information about most of the computer using public.  Employers can learn a lot about a job seeker through her online profile, in fact, if they’re not careful, they can learn too much. (more…)

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June 3, 2011

Lower Private Payroll Numbers than Expected. Why?

Staffing & Employment News

Lower Private Payroll Numbers than Expected, partially due to Re-entry of Discouraged Workers in April?

The jobs market gained momentum over the last few months; in the prior three months the number of jobs added averaged 220,000. The May figures released today however came in lower than expected. While private-sector employment added 83,000 jobs, this was a disappointing reversal of previous months’ growth. Expanding Industries include professional and business services (+44,000), health care (+17,400) and mining.

When an economy is healthy, monthly payrolls gains of around 150,000 are considered healthy; in order to recover from a downturn economists expect increased upwards of 250,000 monthly.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics release questions whether the May numbers are a temporary soft spot or a new trend. Severe domestic weather is not apparently a factor according to the Labor Department, but high energy prices and Japan’s continuing challenges probably are.

“There are good reasons to suppose the third quarter will be better because we have seen some easing in commodity prices, gasoline prices are starting to come down and the bad effects on vehicle production of the Japanese problems will start to unwind,” said Nigel Gault, chief U.S. economist at IHS Global Insight in Lexington, Massachusetts, reported Reuters.

The good news is that initial jobless claims have eased from elevated levels. And while the unemployment rate rose to 9.1 percent last month from 9.0 percent in April, this is probably due in part to the re-entry of discouraged workers who were motivated by the April hiring momentum, and re-entered the job market.

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June 2, 2011

Closing Candidates: A How-To in a Hot Job Market

Joanna Edwards

Joanna Edwards

Closing Candidates: A How-To in a Hot Job Market

By Joanna Edwards, Executive Recruiter, High Tech Sales & Marketing Division Manager

 An undisputable fact: the job market is heating up. Candidates seeking employment no longer go months without returned phone calls, but rather, quite the opposite.  This morning when speaking with a candidate who declared he was ‘actively looking’ for a new role,  I was informed that since beginning his career search on Thursday of last week  he had received 152 emails regarding job opportunities.  An entirely separate call indicated the same trend. This candidate, who was directly recruited out of her organization, had to choose from one of four offers – all with a 10% increase in base salary and a significant equity component.  These are all very solid signs that the job market is better than last year. But with a positive shift in the economy comes a new set of challenges that hiring managers must be prepared to combat.   After 17 phone interviews, six on-site meetings, three reference checks and everyone on your team agreeing that this (and only this) person is the ideal fit, you cannot afford to lose him. So in a candidate’s market, what is the best approach when at the offer stage? Below are some suggestions to help you and the team make a successful hire.

1. Knowledge is power.  It may sound obvious, but the best way to close a candidate is to have as much information as possible, and this starts from the minute you first look at their resume.  After deciding you are interested in having a conversation/interview with the candidate, begin to ask questions.  Here is what you need to ask the candidate – once at the beginning and again as the interview process continues: (more…)

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