March 3, 2014

What to Include in Your Cover Letter

 

Two weeks ago, we published “What NOT to include in Your Cover Letter” and got more hits in a week than many of our articles have gotten all year! Thanks for the read!check

This week, let’s look at what you should include in your cover letter.

Excitement

Convince the hiring manager that you truly want to work there. Tell them specifically why this is your dream job or why you think the company is the best thing since sliced gluten-free bread. Make it personal, make it compelling, tell a story that makes you stand out. If you can paint a picture that makes you look like the ideal candidate and the best thing since sliced bread, you’ve got an in. Show your excitement and make the hiring manager excited to meet you.

 

You as the Solution 

A lot of people might be able to do this job, why are you the best choice? Show that you meet the requirements for the position and that you align with the company’s goals. Tell the reader: How can you make immediate impacts? How can you solve the hiring manager’s problem? What can you do to fulfill and surpass the job responsibilities? While your resume will list your accomplishments in each of your roles, what can you highlight here that is particularly relevant to this position with this company? This is an opportunity to showcase how your particular experience differentiates you from the multitude of other applicants. (more…)

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February 17, 2014

What NOT to Include in Your Cover Letter

 

Reject

Spelling and grammar mistakes

This should be obvious, I know. But really, please re-read your letter don’t just count on Microsoft spell check and proof your grammar for you. There are many mixed up homophones and cognates, abused apostrophes, and careless typos that can slip in. Like brushing your hair and teeth before leaving the house, your cover letter should be properly proofed to ensure it’s ready to go out.

Incorrect title for the position you are applying for

Job seekers often use a cover letter they have previously written and then re-edit it when applying to a new position. This is ill-advised as it can be quite risky if all the variables are not updated correctly, such as the title of the job you are after. If you can’t take the time to make sure the letter targets the position you want, do you think you are conveying true desire for the position? (more…)

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January 27, 2014

Getting Yourself Geared Up for the Executive Job Hunt

Getting-Yourself Geared Up for the Executive Job Hunt

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects jobs for executives to increase only 5 percent through 2020. That’s significantly lower than the average growth rate of most positions. With fewer executive positions to compete for, you’ll need to have the right resume, the right image and the right answers for critical interview questions. Get yourself prepared with these suggestions to keep yourself in the game. (more…)

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November 18, 2013

Do You Really Want to Work There? Get Your Questions Answered When Interviewing for a Job

Do You Really Want to Work There?

Get Your Questions Answered When Interviewing for a Job

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager

By Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, Redfish Technology

The interview process is the usually final step in a company’s selection and vetting process, contingent upon reference and background checks of course.

For candidates this is also the last step typically in the application process. And certainly it is the best opportunity to learn as much as possible about the work environment and company culture, the personalities on the team and the management style, the less tangible aspects that aren’t written on the job description or the company website.

Recruiters often ask candidates along the application process to gauge their interest in a specific opportunity. This is something the candidate should be doing throughout the process. (more…)

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October 14, 2013

Market Yourself by Creating Your Image and Telling Your Story

Market Yourself by Creating Your Image and Telling Your Story

Anna Mathieu

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications

By Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, Redfish Technology
 

As you start circulating your resume around for companies to see, keep in mind almost 40 percent of employers now search social networks when screening applicants, writes Forbes. Another 34 percent said they passed on a candidate because of content they found on the social media sites. These stats say you need to create an image, and be in control of it. Otherwise, the image people find of you online may not be the one you want.

 

Decide What Image You Want to Portray

 

The three questions to understanding the image you want, according to the Daily Muse in Forbes, include:

  • How do you affect the people around you?
  • Who benefits from what you do?
  • What actions do you take to generate that benefit? (more…)
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