Market Yourself by Creating Your Image and Telling Your Story

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

Market Yourself by Creating Your Image and Telling Your Story

Anna Mathieu

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications

By Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, Redfish Technology
 

As you start circulating your resume around for companies to see, keep in mind almost 40 percent of employers now search social networks when screening applicants, writes Forbes. Another 34 percent said they passed on a candidate because of content they found on the social media sites. These stats say you need to create an image, and be in control of it. Otherwise, the image people find of you online may not be the one you want.

 

Decide What Image You Want to Portray

 

The three questions to understanding the image you want, according to the Daily Muse in Forbes, include:

  • How do you affect the people around you?
  • Who benefits from what you do?
  • What actions do you take to generate that benefit? Read more »

The Best-Kept Secrets of Successful Job Seekers

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search

The Best-Kept Secrets of Successful Job Seekers

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

By Jessica Hernandez

Do you ever wonder why other candidates are bombarded with calls for interviews and are fielding offers for jobs left and right … while you’re struggling to garner any attention at all from hiring managers? It could be as simple as the resources these candidates have available to them and how they utilize them. Read more »

How Jim Got a Job, or The Long and Winding Road to Employment

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search

How Jim Got a Job, or The Long and Winding Road to Employment

This is a thought provoking info-graphic on today’s hiring process.

It describes a fictional person’s job search starting online and spending a bunch of time filling out forms, only to get an automated email (Ug, yes another one of those – we use them too!) and a long wait. Success at last, someone from the employer he applied to calls about a different job. Next is a lengthy wait, then interview, then another waiting period, then another interview with an on-the-spot offer, followed by a wait and an official offer with a different title, manager and salary than was verbally offered!

While the road to new or re-employment can be long and twisty, does this process ring true for you? What crazy hiring processes have you been subjected to?

Jim Gets a Job - Recruiter.com

6 Ways to Engage Passive Candidates

Filed under: Best Practices, Employer, Hiring Strategies, Talent Acquisition

6 Ways to Engage Passive Candidates

As a small business owner, engaging passive candidates for positions you’re looking to fill can be an important strategy. There are many reasons for this, the main one being that passive candidates – those who are happy with their current jobs and aren’t actively looking for a new job – often possess more skills and experience than those who are actively looking for jobs.

This may be especially true when it comes to your small business. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, small businesses have more employees (based on percentage) with a high school education or less, and larger firms have more employees with bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Get in on that talent when they aren’t necessarily looking for a job with a small business like yours by learning how to engage passive candidates. Here are six options for doing so:

1. Use Social Media

It’s no surprise that social media like Twitter and Facebook is one of the top ways to engage passive candidates in today’s job environment. Everybody’s got an account, so why not use that to your advantage? This recruitment strategy has worked out particularly well for companies like Starbucks, which uses Facebook and Twitter to turn fans into partners (employees).

Social media can help you in several ways. Use social networks like LinkedIn to get information on potential employees, and use other social networks to brand not just your business but your employment. You can use social media to talk about the various challenges your employees are meeting, and you can even throw out job opportunities on your social media network to reach a larger pool of potential candidates for free.

2. Create a Company Blog

Have your employees write blog articles on what they’re currently working on. This can showcase your business and the benefits and challenges you bring to your employees. It can also help brand your business for potential employees as well as for customers. Showing your business as a great place to work can be one of the best ways to bring in passive candidates who are already relatively happy with their current jobs.

You may also want to provide industry news on your company’s blog. This can keep potential employees coming back for more information every day. Help them stay on top of the latest standards and news, and once you become their favorite source of information, they’ll view you more favorably and will be more likely to read any job postings you put on your company’s blog.

3. Write Enticing Job Descriptions

If you don’t know exactly what a potential job is going to entail, passive candidates are going to pick up on that. Remember, these aren’t people who are actively searching for jobs. That means they’re not going to jump on – or even consider! – a job with a poorly thought-out and poorly written job description.

If you’re not much of a writer, consider hiring a freelancer to write job descriptions for you. Just make sure that you spend plenty of time nailing down exactly what the job will entail and then talk over the details with your writer to make sure you get a job description that is both accurate and enticing.

4. Contact them Personally

When you find some passive candidates in whom you are interested, try contacting them personally, either through email or on the phone. Often times, they’ll be willing to speak with you, even if they aren’t currently looking for a new job. The key here is to be personal and to be genuinely interested in the person you’re speaking with. You may not get them to come to your company right way, but you could end up having a good conversation that will lead to a hire-on later down the road.

5. Targeted Email or Mobile Updates

Provide potential candidates with job updates through email or on their mobile devices. The key here is not to annoy every passive candidate by showering them with updates about jobs that aren’t relevant to their skill set or interests. Instead, target job updates so that they only go to individuals who may be truly interested in the jobs that have come up at your company.

6. Offer Presentations

Finally, you can continue to make yourself valuable to employees in your industry by offering free certification, training, or presentations on industry-related topics. This can be a good way to get passive candidates in your door, where you can have face-to-face conversations with them about the benefits your company has to offer them in exchange for their work. Your business can seek to run federal or state certification courses, or you can just host experts to present on industry topics in an informal environment.

7. Use a Recruiter

Does this sound like too much to do and run your business? Recruiting is a specialized field and the talent management experts specializing in your business sector can take the weight off of your shoulders. From actively recruiting talent to maintaining an ongoing relationship with thousands of passive candidates, recruiters can find and bring on-board the valuable human assets that your business needs, when you need them.

About the Author

Daniela Baker is a small business blogger and social media advocate at CreditDonkey, a credit card comparison website.

Do It Yourself Recruiting

Filed under: Best Practices, Hiring Strategies, Recruiter / Recruiting, Redfish Speaks, Talent Acquisition

Do It Yourself Recruiting

Ryan Thomson

Ryan Thomson

By Ryan Thomson, Executive Recruiter

When helping new clients on their hiring priorities, I encounter a common thread that some think recruiting fees are costly and somehow easy to earn. Recruiting fees are typically a percentage of the first year’s salary, and yes, that can amount to a large figure when hiring executives and top performers. During a recent webinar on Closing Candidates in a Hot Market, an attendee asked “Why should I use a recruiter, they seem expensive for a job I can do on my own.” Read more »

Secrets to Impressing your Recruiter and Landing the Job

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Interview, Job Search, Recruiter / Recruiting, Redfish Speaks, Resume

Secrets to Impressing your Recruiter and Landing the Job

Rob Reeves

Rob Reeves

By Rob Reeves, CEO, President

 

Whether you are applying directly to a company or working with an independent search firm, you need to impress the recruiter! The recruiter is likely your first point of contact, you need to impress them and do your part to streamline the process.

How? Read more »

Things to Know Before Reviewing Your First Resume

Filed under: Best Practices, Employer, Hiring Strategies

Shannon Tinker

Shannon Tinker

Things to Know Before Reviewing Your First Resume

By Shannon Tinker

Hallelujah!  You’ve been given the green light to add employees to your team and not a moment too soon.  Your team has been in the trenches since the economy’s infamous downturn and despite your efforts, your hiring budget has remained nonexistent.  Your new hiring breakthrough is exciting and it’s tempting to start the candidate search ASAP.  Evaluating some key elements before jumping into the candidate pool with both feet can ensure a successful search, and minimize the level of frustration for you and your team. Read more »

When is the Best Time to Look for a New Job?

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Recruiter / Recruiting, Redfish Speaks

Beth Cliff

Beth Cliff

When is the Best Time to Look for a New Job?

By Beth Cliff, Executive Recruiter, High Tech Engineering Talent Manager

The old adage follows that the best time to look for a job is when you already have one.  While this may still hold true, the reality of today’s economic climate dictates that many excellent candidates are finding themselves unemployed and in the midst of a job search.  There are pros and cons to both classifications of candidates – those who are employed and those who are not, when it comes to identifying your next career opportunity.  What I have found over the years as a Recruiter is that no matter what your motivation for seeking a new opportunity, preparation and attitude are key. Read more »

Recovery of the Job Market, This Decade or Next?

Filed under: Jobs/Employment, Tech Trends

Recovery of the Job Market, This Decade or Next?                 

The Center for Economic Policy Research published a report in July 2010 entitled “The Urgent Need for Job Creation” by John Schmitt and Tessa Conroy.

Between December 2007 and December 2009, the U.S. economy lost more than eight million jobs. By the time we return to the number of jobs we had in December 2007, population growth will have increased the potential labor force by about 6.5 million jobs.

Given this data, these projections for recovery can be made based on the following assumptions about the rate of job creation from mid-2010.  Read more »

Credentials, Please

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Interview, Recruiter / Recruiting

Credentials, Please

Credentials?  Qualifications?  Well, what sort of professional development have you done lately?  In today’s uber-competitive, ever specialized workplace having an additional set of skills is absolutely critical for career advancement.  Whether it’s LLM, PMP, CCIE or MBA, the acronyms can be dizzying but from my vantage point it takes certified, specialized knowledge and training to really pass muster these days. Read more »