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iPhone v. Android. Adobe abandons Apple iPhone app development, to focus on Android

Filed under: High Tech / IT / Software

 

iPhone v. Android

Apple has booted Flash and other technologies from the iPhone. The new iPhone developer license restricts a number applications built with technologies including Unity, Titanium, MonoTouch, and Flash CS5, prompting Adobe to abandon further iPhone apps development and to warn developers that Apple may remove content and applications created with Flash from the iTunes store.

Apple’s move constricting iPhone developers is not being well received in many camps. Mike Chambers, Adobe Principal Product Manager for Flash, has written an interesting article on this subject. Chambers writes that “there is no technical reason that Flash can’t run on the iPhone” and that now Adobe will be focusing on other platforms, namely Android.

Android phones and tablets have been running Flash and other technology that Apple has excluded. 80% of internet sites have some form of Flash, and it is rather easy to port games created with Flash that target the iPhone to target other operating systems, such as Android – good news for gamers and all the rest of us.

Will Apple’s iPhone closed platform decision mark a major shift in development of apps? Apple’s first quarter 2010 earnings report showed iPhone sales up 131%, so maybe they won’t notice right away.

Related articles:

TechSpot: Adobe halts further iPhone development, focuses on Android

Mike Chambers: On Adobe, Flash CS5 and iPhone Applications

Will the Android Market suddenly see an influx of Flash-based apps?

Apple vs. Adobe Flash War: Winners and Losers

Should Your Company Go Virtual? – Here’s a Great Article from Inc. Magazine

Filed under: Employers, Human Resources / Capital

34 million Americans are working from home at least part time. Virtual companies are deriving many advantages, and face new issues, when going virtual. Advantages include infrastructure cost savings and the ability to draw from a larger talent pool; challenges include client perception.

The article The Case, and the Plan, for the Virtual Company: How smart entrepreneurs are finding money and happiness in an office-free life by Max Chafkin, Inc.’s senior writer, discusses Inc. Magazine’s experiment in going virtual and various issues to consider. Read more »

Where does the growth come from? A Quick Look at Venture Capital Trends

Filed under: High Tech / IT / Software, Tech Trends

Where does the growth come from? – A Quick Look at Venture Capital Trends

“New and young companies and the entrepreneurs that create them are the engines of job creation and eventual economic recovery” according to the Kauffman Foundation. Both start-ups and young companies (age 2-5 years) account for the net job creation in the American economy; larger companies tend to grow by mergers and acquisitions. Investment is critical to funding startup and young companies. Venture Capital trends were dismal in 2008 and 2009, but are showing a comeback in Q4 2009 and Q1 2010. Read more »

Is now the right time to hire?

Filed under: Employers, Human Resources / Capital

Is now the right time to hire? from the Redfish Build Your Top Team Newsletter, April 2010

Hiring Projections 2010

According to a survey by CareerBuilders, twenty percent of employers anticipate increasing fulltime, permanent employers, which is up 14% over 2009. Positive economic indicators include the decrease in the jobs lost each month over the last several months.  The main industries to be effected by the planned hiring increase are information technology, manufacturing, health care, transportation, financial services, professional and business services, and sales. While companies continue to watch their expenses, there are salary increases planned for existing staff according to the survey. However, the 2010 Salary Guide by Robert Half reports a small decline in the base compensation for many IT positions is slightly declining by an average of 1.3 percent next year. Read more »

Changing Jobs or Careers. Is now the right time?

Filed under: Candidates / Job Seekers, Career Building, Human Resources / Capital

Changing Jobs or Careers. Is now the right time?  from the Redfish Find Your Dream Job Newsletter, April 2010

Recent surveys have shown a lot of dissatisfaction and uncertainty in the workplace, as well as staff cuts, many employees didn’t get a pay raise or bonus in 2009. Is it time to look for another job?

First of all, are companies hiring? Read more »

Software As a Service (SaaS) Software on Demand – Using SaaS the Smart Way

Filed under: High Tech / IT / Software

Software as a Service (SaaS) Today’s business world demands that business owners quickly adapt to a changing environment. Businesses can improve internal operations when they are able to adapt to emerging technologies trends to reduce operational costs and ultimately improve service to clients. Businesses that fail to adapt find that attempting to function using old, supposedly tried-and-true methods and technologies can cost them significant amounts of money. Read more »

Do you have the right employees to take advantage of the coming boom?

Filed under: Employers, Hiring Strategies, Human Resources / Capital

Do you have the right employees to take advantage of the coming boom?

– by Barry Shamis

Good market. Bad market. Nothing has changed. It still remains that the only sustainable competitive advantage is the quality of your people.

No one knows when the current market problems will take a turn for the better. But, only a complete cynic believes that it won’t. Read more »

Thoughtful Interview Preparation – Getting Your Dream Job

Filed under: Candidates / Job Seekers, Career Building

Thoughtful Interview Preparation  – Originally published in the Find Your Dream Job Newsletter, Issue 2.

Getting Your Dream Job 

You’ve identified an opportunity that you are excited about and well-qualified for. You’ve polished and targeted your resume, and crafted your cover letter. Great news: You are invited for an interview! Now it is time to really gear up. Preparation is key – whether you haven’t interviewed in a decade or if you’ve had ten recent interviews.

 Whether you end up in a conversational style Q&A or are engaged in a competency based (behavioral) interview approach, spend time in advance thinking about answers to some potential questions in advance so that you are prepared to answer them naturally and informatively.

Know your Audience: Research the company and the people. Read about them online, ask your recruiter to share insights into the company culture and strengths, network with current and former employees, read the bios of the people you will be meeting with and upper management. Be prepared to identify what about this company attracted you to them, show that you are someone who will be dedicated and invested in this company.

Know the Industry: Who are the company’s competitors, who are their customers and suppliers? What are the key business missions, messaging, and the recent benchmarks? What are the recent trends, challenges and opportunities in the industry? Be prepared to show your knowledge of the industry players/issues and how your experience and skill set is pertinent to the company’s business.

Know the Position: Re-read the job description and be very clear on the duties. What examples can you offer of your experience in success at accomplishing these responsibilities? What are the most relevant highlights of your track record? Be prepared to elaborate on how your experience and skill set will contribute to the company’s success.

Know your Take Away: Why are you the right person for the job? Why should they hire you instead of other candidates?  How can you fit in and contribute immediately? Be prepared to communicate your take away message on why you are the right person for the job.

Here are some examples to help you in your interview preparation.

Ability and Career Initiative questions:

  • How would your boss describe you?
  • What is your reputation at work?
  • What professional accomplishments are you most proud of and why?
  • What is the most important thing you contribute to any organization?
  • Where do you see yourself in 5/10 years?
  • Name three things you like and dislike about your current/last position.
  • Why do you want to leave/did you leave your last position?
  • Why is your current organization a better place for you having worked there?
  • Why would this position be a good move in your career development?
  • What have you done in your current/last position to improve your company’s bottom-line?

You want to paint a picture of yourself as a qualified, capable person, ready, willing and enthusiastic about contributing to the company’s mission. If you are looking for a new position because the last/current one was negative, or if you’ve been unemployed for a while, formulate your response carefully. Never share dirty laundry and don’t waste time on negatives. Focus on the proactive and the positive aspects of your interest in the opportunity you are interviewing for and what you can bring to the table. Show career pride and initiative.

Competency-based questions:

  • Tell me about a situation in which you had a miscommunication with a customer/colleague/boss and how you handled it.
  • Describe a time when you didn’t accomplish a professional goal and how you rectified the situation?
  • What was the biggest professional challenge you faced in your last position and how did you overcome it?
  • Can you describe an example of when you worked with a colleague or group to solve a problem?

You will definitely need to have real-life examples ready. Be prepared to explain how you resolved the situation favorably, what you learned, and how that experience could be applied to the work environment of your potential employer. You want to demonstrate your ability to work well with others, accomplish the mission, be accountable and proactive, and problem-solve.

Real-life Work Scenario:

You may have a real work problem laid before you, and be asked to describe how you would proceed. While this is a little harder to prepare for in advance, you should be thinking about the aspects of the role and draw from your past experience. This is similar to preparing for competency based questions.

New-Age questions:

  • If you were an animal, what animal would you be?
  • If you were a fruit, what kind of fruit would you be?

The interviewer is looking for a correct answer of an animal that is efficient, proactive, social, organized, and a fruit that mixes harmoniously in a fruit salad medley. Hopefully no one is ruled out because they say cat (sleeps a lot) or an avocado (doesn’t mix well in a fruit salad). Perhaps the true point is to see how you might react and if you have a sense of humor.

Gauging Interest and Engagedness:

  • What did you like on our website?  What attracted you to our organization?
  • What questions do you have for me/about the company/role?
  • How could our company do better?

There is no wrong answer to these questions except to not have an answer. This is your opportunity to find out more about the company/management culture, goals, strengths, etc. And importantly, this is your chance to show your serious intent and enthusiasm for the company. If you have no more questions, take this time to express that the conversation has touched on all the points you wanted to explore more and that you appreciate the manager’s candor and time; leave them with the impression of satisfaction as opposed to disinterest.

Formulate your responses using the STAR approach:

When formulating your response, maximize the opportunity to demonstrate your professional success. Situation. Task. Action. Results.

For example, if you are asked what you have done in your current position to improve your company’s bottom-line, “As the International Channel Manager (situation) of a company trying to gain market share in international markets (task), I spearheaded and drove an International Distributor meeting with focus sessions on marketing and sales strategies and tools, introduction to add-on products, as well as software localization and OEM technology and coordination (action). The result was 2 additional language versions of the software being produced, strengthened communications and renewed marketing and sales motivation with a 20% increase in International channel sales and a strengthened relationship with our channel partners (results).

On the humorous side, YouTube videos:

The Interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRX0AQKFtwU

ABC’s The Middle Mike Heck on an interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_H-jNCaEvI

Do you have any funny interview questions or anecdotes? Please share them with us.

What is my return on investment when using a head hunter?

Filed under: Employers, Hiring Strategies

 

What is my return on investment when using a head hunter?

That is a good question!

How do you quantify the time and manpower employed to locate top talent with the best company fit?

If you are in a smaller company, you probably have to invest you own time, time that you are not working on your business objectives, or you may have an administrative or junior colleague trying to understand the experience and skills you need and balance their own job duties.

If you are in a larger company, you may even have an HR or internal recruiter. What is often missing is the ability to access top talent, across industry segments, whether from competitors or partners. One way to put a number on it is to ask yourself what you could have accomplished during the time you were looking for the right person, and how much time you spent with a potential candidate who didn’t meet your hiring objectives.

Redfish Tech is a nation-wide recruiter. We specialize in High Tech and Renewable and Alternate Energy sectors.

We have 15 years of experience and extensive networks in these industries. We can pull talent from all across the continent, and locate the right person quickly. We qualify candidates in terms of both experience and skills, and as regards company cultural fit.

We partner with companies to streamline the process and get the right person within your time frame so that you can focus your time and energy on your core competencies. Redfish has access to top talent who may not be actively looking for a job, and we often are the first to know when experienced people have started looking for their next opportunity to contribute to a new company.

We partner with you and put our extensive recruiting experience to work for you.  We undertake the advertising, perform background checks, keep you informed as to job market conditions, and offer salary and benefit recommendations based on industry trends.

We work on a retained or contingency basis, depending on the needs of your company and the difficulty of filling the position. A partnership with Redfish gives you a greater competitive edge and improved bottom line. Now that is worth taking to the bank.