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How to Get a Raise – Half of Tech Workers Want More

Filed under: Candidates / Job Seekers, Career Building, Salary

How to Get a Raise

Half of technology professionals were not satisfied with their compensation in 2014Money puzzle

 

Tech workers saw a 1.9% pay raise last year according to the 2014 Dice Tech Salary Survey. Does that feel like enough? How do you get the raise you feel you merit?

 

Make Sure You Are a Known Quantity

 

Market yourself, and use numbers – this is just like advice you hear all the time about touting your quantifiable accomplishments on your resume. Make sure you are giving a recap of your accomplishments in your reports or office meetings, using these quantified data points.

 

Be Present and Presenting

 

Not every interaction in a presentation but keep in mind that you choose your presence. Each time you interact with your boss and supervisors and colleagues, you have an opportunity to communicate with them about what you are doing and accomplishing. So rather than gripe about that bothersome client, highlight a sale, lead, new feature, code fix, or other solution you found to help promote the business.

 

Insinuate Yourself

 

Does your boss hate keeping track of the commission list, or especially appreciate an informal Monday morning recap before the meeting, or be relieved at some other time-saving service you understand benefits him/her. This doesn’t mean coffee-serving subservience where inappropriate, it means finding opportunities to be a great and reliable team-player.

 

Provide Value

 

Take every opportunity to maximize return and provide value. This sounds simple and straightforward but you’d be surprised how sometimes people ignore making a suggestion that could better the process/product, save some money, generate a new lead, be useful to someone in need in another department or role, because they somehow don’t feel it is part of their job area. Provide value to your company in your role and without – Merit that raise!

 

Ask for the Raise

 

If you don’t have a formal review coming up, take your boss to lunch or ask for a meeting. Tell your boss you want a raise and pitch him/her on your proposal and be prepared to demonstrate concrete examples of how your work warrants that raise. Share a vision of how your work will continue to benefit the company.

 

Know Your Market Value

 

To be prepared, you should know what other accomplished professionals in your sector and responsibility and experience level are earning. There are all kinds of salary resources on the web of course, but you can also refer to job ads, speak with a recruiter, and ask friends and colleagues in your network to get a good picture of the salary and benefits packages for competitive roles.

 

Be Tenacious

 

If at first you don’t succeed, figure out the right timing and approach to try again. Being tenacious and affirming your objectives will keep a potential raise on your boss’ radar. Your ambition is an important part of how your salary will grow over the course of your career, making sure your employer is on board with that growth requires a dialogue and a trajectory.

 

Move On

 

If you’ve tried and tried and you aren’t getting anywhere, perhaps you are in the wrong place. It may simply be time to move on. With the competition in the tech market, many companies are willing to offer more to recruit new talent. And those who aren’t willing to pay more to retain their talent will be paying more for it later. Twenty-five percent of tech workers who changed employment in 2014 did so for compensation reasons; you can too.

 

Recruiting Success Stories: Justin McDaniel, CRM SaaS

Filed under: Featured Placements

Recruiting Success Stories:

Featured Placement – Justin McDaniel

Account Executive – CRM SaaS

Justin McDaniel

 

Companies enlist Redfish Technology to recruit Sales and Marketing folks when they are ready to grow aggressively. The bar is set high from the initial conversation. He or she expects tenure with roles, relevant software experience and passion. In this particular role, the CEO needed someone with experience selling to public agencies and a proven track record in selling enterprise software, ERP and SaaS. Founded in 2000, Read more »

EdTech / eLearning Trends

Filed under: Edtech

EdTech / eLearning TrendsMany Hands raise high up

Two great things that go great together

The marriage of technology and education is bringing about so many exciting opportunities in EdTech and eLearning. The increasingly affordable accessibility of devices and broadband is transforming the educational landscape and experience beyond anything we had as children. The possibilities are multiplying by the day and the goals are lofty.

Technology in education seeks to increase education mobility (only 5% of Americans whose parents didn’t graduate college will complete a college degree), bring access to quality educational tools regardless of geography, roll out the common core efficiently, better prepare high school students for college, arm educators with more tools and resources, diversify the educational milieu and the corporate landscape, as well as other lofty and creative objectives. Read more »

Decoding the Software Engineer: Code Testing in the Hiring Process

Filed under: Employers, Hiring Strategies, Talent Acquisition

Decoding the Software Engineer

Code Testing in the Hiring Process

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Division

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter

 

Tech recruiting is all about matching culture and skill sets. We are not engineers or coders, we are business solution drivers. And let’s face it, even in a small startup tech company, not everyone is a techie. So how do we find the best technical & engineering talent out there for growth-mode tech companies?

 

We network with development talent, vet prospective candidates often before we ever reach out to them, and we onboard prospects from the get-go – which is easy to do as we only work with companies that we believe in and are excited about, a luxury we are proud and grateful to have.

 

When it comes time to verify the technical skills of the candidates we work with, there are a variety of methods. Read more »

How to Find Top Talent without Being Inundated with Resumes

Filed under: Employers, Hiring Strategies, Talent Acquisition

How to Find Top Talent

without Being Inundated with Resumes

25-Million-Resumes

Most corporate jobs receive 250 resumes per opening.

Everyone wants to cast their net wide and access all the best talent out there, but no one wants a tsunami of resumes flooding their desk and email inbox.

How can you access a wide array of talent but refrain from being accessed yourself non-stop by respondents?

 

There’s a lot of folks out there, actively and passively looking for their next job.

There are 25 million resumes on Indeed.
There are 332 million LinkedIn users, 107 million of them in the US.
The average number of daily LinkedIn mobile job applications is 44,000. (ExpandedRamblings.com)

There are 140 Million unique visitors on Indeed.com monthly. (Indeed.com)

 

There are a lot of folks sending resumes.

Google gets over a million job applications each year and the company only hires about 0.5% of applicants. (About.com)

Procter & Gamble Inc. got nearly a million applications last year for 2,000 open positions. (WSJ.com)

Most corporate jobs receive 250 resumes per opening. (Recruiterbox.com) Read more »

Recruiting Success Stories: Nidhi Jaiswal, Enterprise Content Delivery

Filed under: Featured Placements

Recruiting Success Stories:

Featured Placement – Nidhi Jaiswal

User Experience Designer – Enterprise Content Delivery

Nidhi Jaiswal

This cloud-based software company enables content delivery solutions for some of the world’s largest enterprise companies. Through its powerful Enterprise Content Delivery Network (ECDN), Kontiki enables high quality holistic content delivery that is secure, reliable, network-friendly and easily deployed. Read more »

How to Build Rapport in Your Job Interview

Filed under: Candidates / Job Seekers, Career Building, Job Search

Establishing Fit and Getting the Job Offer

Shaking hands

Eye on the Prize

 

The best outcome of an interview is a job offer at a great company, with good colleagues, in a challenging role, with satisfying remuneration. How do you get there? If you’ve been invited to the interview, most likely you are qualified, or at least pre-qualified for the position.

 

But getting to the offer and getting the offer you’d like means you’ve got to demonstrate your value as well as your ability to fit in with the team and jump right into the work. This can only be achieved if you can build rapport with your interviewers.

 

Two-Way Communication

 

An interview is an interactive dialogue not just a Q&A session that rephrases and reiterates the contents of your resume. And the interviewing goes both ways: Does the hiring manager and team think you are a good fit? Do you think the company, team and opportunity fit your objectives?

 

Convey Your Passion

 

This time to meet is all about communicating your passion and potential for the opportunity at hand. Show your true enthusiasm and appreciation for the position for which you are interviewing, the company’s new technology or market strategy, the leadership’s past record, the latest news the company has publicized. Make it abundantly clear that you can’t wait to get started, share ideas that you have and goals that you’d like to meet.

 

Your Interviewer is a Person too

 

Be prepared for the personal side of things not just the sales numbers or the coding test. Ask your recruiter or others who have interviewed with the company or work there about the interviewer’s style, personality, objectives and anything else you can learn in advance.

 

Pay attention to conversational cues and follow the interviewer’s lead. Listen attentively so that you understand not only the literal information that you are being but also can pick up on the emotional cues and gain insights into the interviewer’s points of pride, or particular challenges, his greatest need in this hire.

 

Research the People

 

Research the people you will be meeting with so you know and understand their backgrounds, and any connections you may share. Ask questions about how their own path led to where they are, what they learned along the way, and what their goals are. Complement the interviewer on his or her accomplishments, and find a natural way to mention your own accomplishments and career goals.

 

Be Passionate and Informed

 

Research the company before the interview and note recent initiatives, products or campaigns the company has rolled out or its future objectives it has announced. Complement the interviewer on the company’s accomplishments and targets. Ask about what the interviewer would like you to accomplish in the first 3-6-12 months on the job, and about upcoming projects or challenges you’d get to be involved in.

 

Connecting

 

Throughout, find points of connection. This may be past or present colleagues, alumni from past schools or clubs, shared travel and hobbies, mutual places you’ve lived. Use humor to create a light and relaxed atmosphere. Show your genuine warmth and personality, be respectful and appreciative.

 

In short, if you can be likeable, communicate your skills and accomplishments, and show you really want this job, while making a personal connection, you will build the rapport with the interviewer that distinguishes you from other candidates. This rapport will give the interviewer confidence that you are an easy person to communicate with, who will fit in with the team, and who is passionate about the opportunity.

 

About the Author:

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, brings together in-the-trenches recruiting experience as well as years of marketing and sales success in a variety of industries from software to real estate development. She thrives on evangelizing the Redfish brand and communicating Redfish’s expert recruiting services, to drive bottom line results.

Redfish Technology

Building Growth-Mode Tech Companies with Hand-Picked Talent

Founded in Silicon Valley in 1996, Redfish Technology is a leading provider of high tech professional and executive talent. Partnering with growth mode companies, small and large, Redfish staffs executive functions and builds out the teams below. Redfish experts provide advice and perspective on hiring, career building, and job search – check us out on the web: www.redfishtech.com

Recruiting Success Stories: Kyle Raprager, Semantic Intelligence Software

Filed under: Featured Placements

Recruiting Success Stories:

Featured Placement – Kyle Raprager

Senior Account Executive – Semantic Intelligence Software

Kyle Raprager

Recruiting for the leading enterprise software company specializing in the delivery of an advanced semantic intelligence platform means finding smart people! The company has created cutting-edge,patented technology that allows for semantic differentiation in big data. And just as the technology has set the company apart from all competitors, the sales executives do too. So when ExpertSystem tasked us with finding an experienced territory sales director, Read more »

Do I Have to Disclose My Salary?

Filed under: Salary

Jon Piggins, IT Recruiter

Jon Piggins – IT Recruiter, Sales & Marketing

By Jon Piggins, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

 

Salary Disclosure Questions Pre-Interview Process

There are a lot of opinions on salary negotiations and salary disclosure: Should you tell your current salary or just your desired salary? Should you give this up front if asked, or save it until you are at an offer stage? In our experience, most all companies are going to want to know both your current salary and your desired before investing in the interview process, some will even want your full salary history.

 

Reasons for the Salary Question

From the point of view of a recruiter working with primarily growth-mode tech companies, there are compelling reasons for the salary question. Read more »

Are You at One of the 90% of Companies that Does What Everyone Hates?

Filed under: Human Resources / Capital, Talent Retention

Yep, talking about the annual performance review.

Performance Review Time

It’s Coming Up. How Do You Feel About It?

 

Studies show that not only do employees generally dislike this exercise but so do managers and even the HR department. Time for some disruption – ya think?

The Perils and Perturbations of the Performance Review

 

There’s some great reading on the perils and perturbations of the performance review. As a recap, they tend to pit people against each other, and they are predominantly backward looking – two things no company ought to be focusing on at the detriment of building collaboration and communication, making forward-looking plans, and retaining top talent. These are some recommended reports/articles:

 

Behold The Entrenched — And Reviled — Annual Review

By Yuki Noguchi

“Performance review season is nearing, and if that makes you break out into a cold sweat, you’re not alone. Studies show between 60 percent and 90 percent of employees, including managers, dislike the performance evaluation. Some companies are starting to look at alternatives, but the performance review is pretty entrenched.”

 

Get Rid of the Performance Review!  

By Samuel A. Culbert

“You can call me “dense,” you can call me “iconoclastic,” but I see nothing constructive about an annual pay and performance review. It’s a mainstream practice that has baffled me for years. To my way of thinking, a one-side-accountable, boss-administered review is little more than a dysfunctional pretense.”

 

An Alternate Strategy: Cultivating and rewarding passion and engagement

 

So since performance management is important, but performance reviews aren’t creating the passionate and engaged people you want in your company, what is the answer?

Companies are trying different approaches. Here are some that might be of interest to you:

 

Juniper Networks is turning words on the wall into behaviors in action.

Juniper Networks replaced the performance review with a “conversation day” that has achieved a record 93% participation, and 66% of participants found it “helpful” or “extremely helpful”. The semi-annual conversation day has employees and managers sit down to discuss areas for improvement and opportunities for new growth, set goals aligned with employees’ career aspirations. And importantly, there are no rankings and ratings associated with performance measurement. One of the positive results is that Juniper retains more top performers now.

 

Why Adobe Abolished The Annual Performance Review And You Should, Too

By Drake Baer

“When Donna Morris joined Adobe in 2002 as a senior director of global talent management, she noticed that the annual performance review, such a central part of the human resources job she had been hired to do, wasn’t much of a resource to the humans it served.”

 

A Systems Thinking Alternative to Performance Reviews          

By Steve Rogalsky

“A refreshing discussion of what can be influenced and how much can’t by individual performance, and how to elicit it. An experiment with a conversation aimed at pulling out the performance goals of employees by having a conversation and asking: What are you proud of? What do you want to learn or improve this year? What part of our team’s system is preventing you from doing your job better? What should we improve or change? How is the company enabling or inhibiting you from achieving your best? What do you need from me? How can I help?”

 

Suggesting an Alternative to Performance Reviews

By Josh Patrick

“Instead of one annual review, I suggest setting up regular, one-on-one coaching sessions with your direct reports. The sessions should run from 15 to 45 minutes and should be held every three to four weeks. The goal is to have a continuing conversation aimed at helping employees become great at what they do.”

 

What do you think?

 

What kind of performance review does your company use?

Do you like it?

What would you choose to use if you had the choice?

If you think there’s a better way, share this!