2 Steps to Hack your Career Search (in 10 minutes or less)

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker

2 Steps to Hack your Career Search (in 10 minutes or less)

 

Actively looking for a new job…or just want to test the water to see what’s out there, but the thought of overhauling your old resume or creating a new one makes you cringe? 5-10 minutes spent on making a few changes & updates to your LinkedIn profile is a great way to increase your visibility to hiring companies & recruiters.

 

Companies & recruiters utilize Linkedin’s platform to run granular searches for candidates based on keywords in their profiles and their account settings. You can help control if and how you’ll be included in the results of these searches. Follow the simple steps below to increase your profile’s visibility and your odds for being contacted about relevant, new opportunities.

 

1st go to your linkedin profile and click on the “pencil” edit icon on the right hand corner (adjacent to your profile picture). Make sure that your contact info is up to date and that your “Summary” contains key words relevant to not only your current position, but also to the type of position(s) you’re interested in.

 

2nd, modify your settings to drive your relevance in searches being done on Linekedin. You can do this two ways:

 

Straight from Linkedin’s help page:

Sharing your career interests with recruiters from the Settings & Privacy page.

To share your career interests from the Settings & Privacy page:

  1. Click the Me icon at the top of your LinkedIn homepage.
  2. Select Settings & Privacy from the dropdown.
  3. Click the Privacy tab at the top of the page.
  4. Under the Job seeking preferences section, click Change next to Let recruiters know you’re open to opportunities.
  5. Switch the toggle to Yes to share that you’re open and appear in recruiter searches matching your career interests. Switch the toggle to No to stop sharing your career interests with recruiters.
  6. Your changes will be saved automatically.

Note:  Visit the Career interests page to edit additional settings such as job titles you’re considering, the types of jobs you’re open to, the industry you prefer, and more. Learn more about updating your career interests

 

Sharing your career interests with recruiters from your profile.

To share your career interests from your profile:

  1. Click the Me icon at the top of your LinkedIn homepage and click View profile under your name.
  2. From Your dashboard, click Career interests to access the Career interests page.
  3. In the Career interests section, toggle right to turn this feature on.
  1. You can write an optional introduction about yourself and anything else you’d like the recruiters to know. The maximum character count is 300.
  2. Follow the prompts on the page to select your career preferences:
    • Where are you in your search?
    • What job titles are you considering?
    • Where would you like your next job to be located?
    • What types of jobs are you open to?
    • What industries do you prefer?
    • What size company would you like to work for? (Number of employees)
  1. Any changes made to your job preferences will be automatically saved.

 

For more recommendations on how to super charge you job hunt, contact Redfish Technology’s teams of experienced recruiters today!

The Top 5 Secrets to Landing your Dream Job – By Tory Thomas

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Redfish Speaks

The Top 5 Secrets to Landing your Dream Job

By Tory Thomas, Executive Recruiter, IT Sales & Marketing

Tory Thomas, Executive Recruiter, Tech Sales & Marketing Division

I work with job seekers on a daily basis as a recruiter in the tech industry. Often times, candidates are unaware of a few tactics that can give them competitive edge in this market.

 

This difference between an active job seeker versus and passive job seeker is their work status. An active job seeker is unemployed, unsatisfied in their current role or a reduction in force is imminent whereas a passive job seeker isn’t necessarily looking for a new job. Read more »

Connecting in Your Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Employer, Interview

Connecting in Your Interview

Ideas for meeting people and relationship buildingConnect in the Interview

 

Business is made up of people working together on an activity for the benefit of all involved: boss, employee, customer, the society at large hopefully! And the interview is an interactive opportunity for both employer and prospective employee to evaluate fit and decide if they want to collaborate on the company’s goals.

 

While hard skills may need to be verified, such as a software developer being able to coder efficiently, and while references should always be checked, the interview has other objectives beyond these. Read more »

How to Get a Raise – Half of Tech Workers Want More

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Salary

How to Get a Raise

Half of technology professionals were not satisfied with their compensation in 2014Money puzzle

 

Tech workers saw a 1.9% pay raise last year according to the 2014 Dice Tech Salary Survey. Does that feel like enough? How do you get the raise you feel you merit?

 

Make Sure You Are a Known Quantity

 

Market yourself, and use numbers – this is just like advice you hear all the time about touting your quantifiable accomplishments on your resume. Make sure you are giving a recap of your accomplishments in your reports or office meetings, using these quantified data points.

 

Be Present and Presenting

 

Not every interaction in a presentation but keep in mind that you choose your presence. Each time you interact with your boss and supervisors and colleagues, you have an opportunity to communicate with them about what you are doing and accomplishing. So rather than gripe about that bothersome client, highlight a sale, lead, new feature, code fix, or other solution you found to help promote the business.

 

Insinuate Yourself

 

Does your boss hate keeping track of the commission list, or especially appreciate an informal Monday morning recap before the meeting, or be relieved at some other time-saving service you understand benefits him/her. This doesn’t mean coffee-serving subservience where inappropriate, it means finding opportunities to be a great and reliable team-player.

 

Provide Value

 

Take every opportunity to maximize return and provide value. This sounds simple and straightforward but you’d be surprised how sometimes people ignore making a suggestion that could better the process/product, save some money, generate a new lead, be useful to someone in need in another department or role, because they somehow don’t feel it is part of their job area. Provide value to your company in your role and without – Merit that raise!

 

Ask for the Raise

 

If you don’t have a formal review coming up, take your boss to lunch or ask for a meeting. Tell your boss you want a raise and pitch him/her on your proposal and be prepared to demonstrate concrete examples of how your work warrants that raise. Share a vision of how your work will continue to benefit the company.

 

Know Your Market Value

 

To be prepared, you should know what other accomplished professionals in your sector and responsibility and experience level are earning. There are all kinds of salary resources on the web of course, but you can also refer to job ads, speak with a recruiter, and ask friends and colleagues in your network to get a good picture of the salary and benefits packages for competitive roles.

 

Be Tenacious

 

If at first you don’t succeed, figure out the right timing and approach to try again. Being tenacious and affirming your objectives will keep a potential raise on your boss’ radar. Your ambition is an important part of how your salary will grow over the course of your career, making sure your employer is on board with that growth requires a dialogue and a trajectory.

 

Move On

 

If you’ve tried and tried and you aren’t getting anywhere, perhaps you are in the wrong place. It may simply be time to move on. With the competition in the tech market, many companies are willing to offer more to recruit new talent. And those who aren’t willing to pay more to retain their talent will be paying more for it later. Twenty-five percent of tech workers who changed employment in 2014 did so for compensation reasons; you can too.

 

How to Build Rapport in Your Job Interview

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Interview, Job Search

Establishing Fit and Getting the Job Offer

Shaking hands

Eye on the Prize

 

The best outcome of an interview is a job offer at a great company, with good colleagues, in a challenging role, with satisfying remuneration. How do you get there? If you’ve been invited to the interview, most likely you are qualified, or at least pre-qualified for the position.

 

But getting to the offer and getting the offer you’d like means you’ve got to demonstrate your value as well as your ability to fit in with the team and jump right into the work. This can only be achieved if you can build rapport with your interviewers.

 

Two-Way Communication

 

An interview is an interactive dialogue not just a Q&A session that rephrases and reiterates the contents of your resume. And the interviewing goes both ways: Does the hiring manager and team think you are a good fit? Do you think the company, team and opportunity fit your objectives?

 

Convey Your Passion

 

This time to meet is all about communicating your passion and potential for the opportunity at hand. Show your true enthusiasm and appreciation for the position for which you are interviewing, the company’s new technology or market strategy, the leadership’s past record, the latest news the company has publicized. Make it abundantly clear that you can’t wait to get started, share ideas that you have and goals that you’d like to meet.

 

Your Interviewer is a Person too

 

Be prepared for the personal side of things not just the sales numbers or the coding test. Ask your recruiter or others who have interviewed with the company or work there about the interviewer’s style, personality, objectives and anything else you can learn in advance.

 

Pay attention to conversational cues and follow the interviewer’s lead. Listen attentively so that you understand not only the literal information that you are being but also can pick up on the emotional cues and gain insights into the interviewer’s points of pride, or particular challenges, his greatest need in this hire.

 

Research the People

 

Research the people you will be meeting with so you know and understand their backgrounds, and any connections you may share. Ask questions about how their own path led to where they are, what they learned along the way, and what their goals are. Complement the interviewer on his or her accomplishments, and find a natural way to mention your own accomplishments and career goals.

 

Be Passionate and Informed

 

Research the company before the interview and note recent initiatives, products or campaigns the company has rolled out or its future objectives it has announced. Complement the interviewer on the company’s accomplishments and targets. Ask about what the interviewer would like you to accomplish in the first 3-6-12 months on the job, and about upcoming projects or challenges you’d get to be involved in.

 

Connecting

 

Throughout, find points of connection. This may be past or present colleagues, alumni from past schools or clubs, shared travel and hobbies, mutual places you’ve lived. Use humor to create a light and relaxed atmosphere. Show your genuine warmth and personality, be respectful and appreciative.

 

In short, if you can be likeable, communicate your skills and accomplishments, and show you really want this job, while making a personal connection, you will build the rapport with the interviewer that distinguishes you from other candidates. This rapport will give the interviewer confidence that you are an easy person to communicate with, who will fit in with the team, and who is passionate about the opportunity.

 

About the Author:

Anna Mathieu, Marketing Communications Manager, brings together in-the-trenches recruiting experience as well as years of marketing and sales success in a variety of industries from software to real estate development. She thrives on evangelizing the Redfish brand and communicating Redfish’s expert recruiting services, to drive bottom line results.

Redfish Technology

Building Growth-Mode Tech Companies with Hand-Picked Talent

Founded in Silicon Valley in 1996, Redfish Technology is a leading provider of high tech professional and executive talent. Partnering with growth mode companies, small and large, Redfish staffs executive functions and builds out the teams below. Redfish experts provide advice and perspective on hiring, career building, and job search – check us out on the web: www.redfishtech.com

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

Filed under: Best Practices, Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Resume, Social Media

Recruiting Trends

Career Text On A Gold Key With Black Background As Symbol Of New Job

The Top 10 Best Recruitment Practices coming out of one the ERE Conference Think Tank Sessions include recommendations to hiring managers and recruiters on finding and engaging candidates. Carl Kutsmode’s article is a good read, especially for those recruiting talent.

 

Recruiting Trends for Job Seekers

What about advice for passive and active job seekers? How can job seekers understand these recruiting trends and leverage them in their own career management?

 

The Top “Get Recruited” Practices for Job Seekers (in no particular order)

 

Be findable online

As a job seeker, passive or active, you should be managing your LinkedIn profile, GitHub account, and other relevant specialized professional (social) media sites to provide an up-to-date professional portrait of yourself. Use keywords and active descriptions of your accomplishments so that searches are accurately identifying you.

 

Be attractive

I don’t mean you should go get a make-over, but ditch the selfie you took with your smartphone in a cubicle with those fluorescent lights that shows both chins. Make your online profiles attractive by keeping active on these sites, posting new projects, articles, updates, you increase the chances of being seen and promote a picture of yourself as a dynamic professional in your field.

 

Reach out

Search out the companies you like the most and connect with them via LinkedIn, and other media. Don’t just hit ‘connect’: Make a comment on their latest PR or post. Tell them you want to connect because you are passionate about their sector. Name the other professionals you have a relationship with at the company to strengthen the connection. Try to reach out in a meaningful way, it will give more momentum to further discussion and make you stand out. Connect with various players at the company from managers to HR.

 

Return calls/emails

When recruiting is done seriously, it is a sales function – the point is to get results. If you are contacted by an external recruiter or an internal HR person, respond even if you aren’t looking for a change now. A few minutes of prompt courtesy now will earn you respect and preference in the future; a lack of response or rudeness could get you blacklisted. No one wants to waste your time, and they certainly don’t want to waste their own time and effort.

 

Hackathon/Hangout

For those companies that really thrill you, try participating in a company event such as a hackathon or hangout. Participate actively so that you can show your stuff and facilitate making meaningful connections with the people working there. It may or may not get you a job offer today, but it will multiply your connections and differentiate you.

 

Post your resume

LinkedIn is definitely the best place to be for professionals, but there are many places to be online. Your own website is a great way to present what you want how you want. GitHub is a great place for developers to strut their stuff. Job boards are a great way to be found. Posting your resume is a good indication you are interested in dialogue and opportunities and not just counting down the days to retire or cash in your equity and move to the tropics!

 

Network!

Ok, all the above qualifies as networking. But there’s also meetup.com, industry associations, trade shows, alumni groups, special interest associations, and many, many opportunities. It may take a little time trying out various opportunities to find the right feel and return on your time, so take a look and start trying out those you haven’t yet.

The Getting Hired Elevator Speech

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

When is the last time you took an elevator?

optimistic young businesspeople on a white background

Some of you are rocking the views from your elevator ride! Some folks are taking the stairs wearing their activity tracker. Some folks have made successful careers in places where elevators are hard to find (yippee!), or where they stay in their fuzzy bunny slippers all day (ahhh). Whatever your case, do you have an elevator speech? Read more »

Resumes – Lipstick on a Pig

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Career Building, Redfish Speaks, Resume

Resumes – Lipstick on a PigDon't put lipstick on me!

If you Embellish, it will be a Blemish – or Much Worse

 

The results of a recent Career Builder survey have been splattered all over the internet in the last several days. The responses reveal that 58% of employers have caught a lie on a resume; and 33 % said they have seen an increase in resume embellishments post-recession.

 

The poll found that this transgressions include embellished skill set (57%), embellished responsibilities (55%), dates of employment (42%), job title (34%), academic degree (33%), companies worked (26%), and accolades/awards (18%). It is very interestingly the industry that finds the most fibbing is financial services (eh-hem) at 73%! But Information Technology came in a 63%, and Health Care at 63%.

 

HireRight.com, a provider of on-demand employment background screening, found that 34% of job applicants lie on resumes. Read more »

10 Things You Need to Do In Your Job Search

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Redfish Speaks, Social Media

Ten Things You Need to Do In Your Job Search

Ten Things You Need to Do In Your Job SearchDo you find yourself looking for a new career opportunity? Has it been a while? Here are ten things you should do in your job search.

1. Set aside time every day to perform your job searching activities.

An active job search requires dedication. How much time will it take? That depends on your situation and your motivation. If you are working, it may be only 30-60 minutes per day; if you are out of work and are motivated to find a job soon, then you should consider your job search a full-time activity.

2. Do Some Self-Assessment.

Take a good hard look at yourself. What are your best attributes? What are your least developed ones? Where do you excel? What do you bring to the table? What are you accomplishments?  Quantify these. This exercise is imperative for re-vamping your resume and preparing for interviews, but more importantly this type of self-assessment should allow you to take a fresh look at the kind of work and industries that you want to pursue. Read more »

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Filed under: Candidate / Job Seeker, Job Search, Resume

The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

LinkedIn, and Facebook, and Dice, oh my!

By Anna Mathieu
The Résumé is Dead, Long Live the Résumé

Professional networking site LinkedIn is the leading social media venue for career networking and recruiting alike. The concise display of Experience, Education, Skills, and Projects, peppered with Endorsements and Recommendations, ensures easy accessibility and searchability in a well-packaged graphic format.

 

Monster, Dice, CareerBuilder, The Ladders, Glassdoor, Execunet, etc. all offer a digital compendium of candidate’s qualifications. Not only can you search for jobs, but recruiters and hiring managers can use keyword search to land on your profile. One click applications make it easy peasy lemon squeezy to apply for a job. Read more »